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Editor:

I notice that a few opinion writers tend to rudely dismiss other writers’ publicly shared ideas as “nonsense.” Further, they make it clear that the West Valley View’s opinion editors err in printing those viewpoints the critics deem nonsensical. Did they miss the “freedom of expression” class?

The newspaper’s fine folks are editors, not censors. They don’t try to suppress free speech. Such negative comments seem offensive at best and intolerant at worst (thus, very un-American to me).

Let’s all take a deep breath and consider the timeless words of the French philosopher Voltaire: “I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.”

Ken Williams

Goodyear

Compare fairly

Editor:

Each day I am bombarded by numbers and scare messages regarding the coronavirus. Yes, this is a serious concern, but people need to look at this realistically with regard to other diseases. 

Today on “Meet the Press,” we were presented with the following numbers: We have had 937,659 cases and 53,352 deaths in the United States. Scary numbers, right? But these are really misleading when taken in context. These numbers represent an approximately 96% recovery rate. The number of deaths is only slightly higher than the average yearly seasonal death rate for the influenza during the last 20 years. During the 2017-18 flu season, the CDC estimated 61,099 deaths. During the 1968-69 flu season, we had approximately 100,000 deaths from the flu. During the 1957-58 flu season, we had approximately 116,000 deaths from the flu. During none of these times did we go as crazy over controlling the disease as we have currently. At no time, including during the 675,000 deaths from the Spanish flu of the 1918-19 season, did we shut down and try to destroy the economy and daily life of the United States. Yes, this is a serious disease, but not as it’s being portrayed. Yes, we need to take precautions, but we don’t need to shut down all our businesses and close down normal life. It’s time news agencies and government officials report things in context and we react accordingly. It’s time to open this country back up.

Niles Dunnells

Avondale

 

Goes around,

comes around

Editor:

In 1964, in an attempt to defeat Barry Goldwater, the Democratic National Committee made a commercial. The commercial was of a little girl, maybe 3 years old, picking daisies in her garden.

As the adorable and innocent little girl picked the petals off the flower, she counted their number. As she came to five, four, three, two and one at the same time, you could hear a background voice counting down to the explosion of a nuclear bomb. Immediately, the full impact of a nuclear explosion was flashed across the screen.

In my opinion, that commercial was the one singular most important reason why Goldwater was defeated. The Democrats had worked very hard to portray Barry Goldwater as a loose cannon. The implied question was, “Do you want Goldwater’s finger on the nuclear trigger?” That commercial was a masterpiece and full of emotion.

Fast forward to the present day. Everyone knows sleepy Joe Biden has lost his mental agility and makes gaffes like crazy anytime he appears in public. He frequently doesn’t know what day of the week it is or what office he is running for. He does not make many public appearances, which is by design.

That 1964 commercial was as low down and dirty as it gets. I think this year, the Republicans should get just as low down and dirty as the Democrats have been for years. The Republicans should make a similar commercial. They should ask the question, “Do you really want Joe Biden’s finger on the nuclear trigger?” If they have the guts to do so, they will keep the presidency. They should run the commercial nationally the day Biden secures the nomination. They should beat that commercial to death and ride it to victory.

Am I the first one to have thought of this brilliant idea? This is no time to play nice guy with the Democrats. They deserve no respect at all! God bless President Trump and his pro-American agenda.

Roy Azzarello

Goodyear